My Method for Searching for Retuner Settings

No one knows everything this mod can do. Did you know you can tune the size of your sims nostrils with this mod? I'm kidding.
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Tropical Insomniac
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My Method for Searching for Retuner Settings

Post by Tropical Insomniac » November 10th, 2018, 9:25 pm

This only works on macOS and Linux, because Windows doesn't have the required tool.
  1. I converted the FullEATuningP163.xml file to a csv, using this site with a semi-colon as the delimiter. This results in each setting being on a single line. 
  2. In Terminal, I use grep to search for relevant words. For example grep -i horse FullEATuning_P163.csv will output a list of every setting containing the word "horse". The grep command needs to be run from the directory where the FullEATuning file is located.
There are other things that can be done with this outpit in Terminal, including counting the number of results, saving the results to a text file, and filtering on a second term. If anyone's interested, I'll be happy to post the commands to do those things.

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igazor
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My Method for Searching for Retuner Settings

Post by igazor » November 10th, 2018, 10:41 pm

Many of us also find that the search tools that come with Notepad++ (on Windows) and other such enhanced text file readers are sufficient for the task. Note that's "Notepad Plus Plus," not the regular built-in Notepad.
https://notepad-plus-plus.org
 

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Tropical Insomniac
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My Method for Searching for Retuner Settings

Post by Tropical Insomniac » November 11th, 2018, 1:21 am

Yeah, I often use a GUI text editor called Bluefish, which is similar to Notepad++, but available on Linux, macOS, and Windows. Since I use all three OSes at various times, I try to use software that is available on all three.

I do find text editors like that useful when there aren't a lot of results, but when there are more than about 10 or 15, that's when grep really starts to shine for me. If nothing else, being able to save the results to a separate file makes it a lot easier to sort through the results. You could probably achieve a similar result with a spreadsheet.

Dunno if you've ever done anything with regular expressions, but both the terminal and the advanced GUI text editors support them. Regexes can do a lot of powerful stuff, although for this type of searching probably the most useful thing is being able to exclude certain text. A good example is on the horse search, I got a lot of "horseshoe" results, and with a regular expression it was easy to modify the search to exclude results that included "shoe" immediately after "horse".

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